GRAMMAR

GRAMMAR SECTION: COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES

Esta semana desde la Academia Inglés Bilbao School te explicamos las formas gramaticales de “comparatives and superlativas».

 

GRAMMAR POINT:     COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES

 

We use the comparative to show how things are different and we use the superlative to show which things are the most different (very different).

We form the comparative by putting -er after an adjective or more before an adjective or adverb.

We form the superlative by putting -est after an adjective or most before an adjective or adverb.

-er and -est are used when an adjective is 1 syllable long, ends in -y and for some words which are two syllables long.

More and most are used when an adjective is 3 or more syllables long, for adverbs and for some 2 syllable adjectives.

 

-ER

 

-EST

1 SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES
SOME 2 SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES
ADJECTIVES ENDING IN -Y

 

MORE

MOST

SOME 2 SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES
MORE THAN 3 SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES
ADVERBS

 

There is no rule that tells us which two syllable adjectives use -er and -est and which use more and most.  This, like many other things in English, is something that you will learn with practice.

  1. That is the most stupid explanation I have ever heard.
  2. The most modern looking buildings are in the North of the city.
  3. The areas in the south are the greenest parts of the country.
  4. This exercise is the hardest we have done this week.
  5. Golf is more difficult and more physical than most people think.
  6. Colleen is the most interesting teacher I have had.

 

When an -er/-est adjective ends with an -e we only write 1 e.

  1. Stephanie arrived to work later than Frank again.
  2. This flower is one of the rarest in the world

 

When an -er/-est adjective ends with a consonant + y we write -iest.

  1. Those are the prettiest dresses I have.
  2. September has the dullest afternoons of the year.

 

When an -er/-est adjective ends with one vowel + consonant we write the consonant twice.  In American English this depends on the word.

  1. That was the biggest sandwich I have ever eaten.
  2. That is the greenest garden in our community.

 

GOOD/WELLBETTERBEST
BAD/BADLYWORSEWORST
LITTLE (FOR UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS)LESSLEAST
FARFARTHER/ FURTHERFARTHEST/ FURTHEST
FUNMORE FUNMOST FUN

 

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